Damping

Dissipation of energy in a system, either through time or distance.

The term is generally applied to the attenuation of sound in a structure owing to the internal sound-dissipative properties of the structure or to the addition of sound-dissipative materials.

Constrained-layer damper

A treatment to control the vibration of a structure by bonding a layer of damping material between the structure’s surface and an additional elastic layer (that is, the constraining layer), whose relative stiffness is greater than that of the damping material, so that energy is dissipated through cyclic deformation of the damping material, primarily in shear.

Free-layer damper

A treatment to control the vibration of a structural by bonding a layer of damping material to the structure’s surface so that energy is dissipated through cyclic deformation of the damping material, primarily in tension-compression.

Glassy region of a damping material

A temperature region where a damping material is characterized by a relatively high modulus and a loss factor that increases from extremely low to moderate as temperature increases.

Rubbery region of a damping material

A temperature region where a damping material is characterized by a relatively low modulus and a loss factor that decreases from moderate to low as temperature increases.

Transition region of a damping material

A temperature region between the glassy region and the rubbery region where a damping material is characterized by the loss factor passing through a maximum and the modulus rapidly decreasing as temperature increases.

Reference

ASTM E756 Measuring Vibration-Damping Properties of Materials

See also: Characteristic Equation, Damping Factor, Damping Pad, Nonlinear Damping, Viscous Damping.

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Subjects: Noise & Vibration


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