Arc Welding

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A group of welding processes in which fusion is obtained by heating with an electric arc or arcs, with or without the use of filler metal.

Arc Blow

The deflection of an electric arc from its normal path because of magnetic forces.

Arc Length

The distance between the tip of the electrode and the weld puddle.

Arc Voltage

The voltage across the welding arc.

Atomic Hydrogen Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is obtained by heating with an arc maintained between two metal electrodes in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Pressure and/or filler metal may or may not be used.

Bare Electrode

An arc welding electrode that has no coating other than that incidental to the drawing of the wire.

Bare Metal-Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is obtained by heating with an unshielded arc between a bare or lightly coated electrode and the work. Pressure is not used and filler metal is obtained from the electrode.

Carbon-Arc Welding

A welding process in which fusion is produced by an arc between a carbon electrode and the work. Pressure and/or filler metal and/or shielding may or may not be used.

Composite Electrode

A filler metal electrode used in arc welding, consisting of more than one metal component combined mechanically. It may or may not include materials that improve the properties of the weld, or stabilize the arc.

Covered Electrode

A metal electrode with a covering material that stabilizes the arc and improves the properties of the welding metal. The material may be an external wrapping of paper, asbestos, and other materials or a flux covering.

Crater

A depression at the termination of an arc weld.

Direct Current Electrode Negative

The arrangement of direct current arc welding leads in which the work is the positive pole and the electrode is the negative pole of the welding arc.

Direct Current Electrode Positive

The arrangement of direct current arc welding leads in which the work is the negative pole and the electrode is the positive pole of the welding arc.

Gas Carbon-Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is produced by heating with an electric arc between a carbon electrode and the work. Shielding is obtained from an inert gas such as helium or argon. Pressure and/or filler metal may or may not be used.

Gas Metal-Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is produced by heating with an electric arc between a metal electrode and the work. Shielding is obtained from an inert gas such as helium or argon. Pressure and/or filler metal may or my not be used.

Gas Tungsten-Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is produced by heating with an electric arc between a tungsten electrode and the work while an inert gas forms around the weld area to prevent oxidation. No flux is used.

Globular Transfer

A type of metal transfer in which molten filler metal is transferred across the arc in large droplets.

Hand Shield

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A device used in arc welding to protect the face and neck. It is equipped with a filter glass lens and is designed to be held by hand.

Helmet

A device used in arc welding to protect the face and neck. It is equipped with a filter glass and is designed to be worn on the head.

Impregnated-Tape Metal-Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is produced by heating with an electric arc between a metal electrode and the work. Shielding is obtained from decomposition of impregnated tape wrapped around the electrode as it is fed to the arc. Pressure is not used, and filler metal is obtained from the electrode.

Metal-Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which a metal electrode is held so that the heat of the arc fuses both the electrode and the work to form a weld.

Reverse Polarity

The arrangement of direct current arc welding leads in which the work is the negative pole and the electrode is the positive pole of the welding arc.

Shielded Welding

An arc welding process in which protection from the atmosphere is obtained through use of a flux, decomposition of the electrode covering, or an inert gas.

Spatter

The metal particles expelled during arc and gas welding which do not form a part of the weld.

Spray Transfer

A type of metal transfer in which molten filler metal is propelled axially across the arc in small droplets.

Straight Polarity

The arrangement of direct current arc welding leads in which the work is the positive pole and the electrode is the negative pole of the welding arc.

String Bead Welding

A method of metal arc welding on pieces 3/4 in. (19 mm) thick or heavier in which the weld metal is deposited in layers composed of strings of beads applied directly to the face of the bevel.

Stud Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is produced by heating with an electric arc drawn between a metal stud, or similar part, and the other workpiece, until the surfaces to be joined are properly heated. They are brought together under pressure.

Submerged Arc Welding

An arc welding process in which fusion is produced by heating with an electric arc or arcs between a bare metal electrode or electrodes and the work. The welding is shield by a blanket of granular, fusible material on the work. Pressure is not used. Filler metal is obtained from the electrode, and sometimes from a supplementary welding rod.

Tungsten Electrode

A non-filler metal electrode used in arc welding or cutting, made principally of tungsten.

Weaving

A technique of depositing weld metal in which the electrode is oscillated. It is usually accomplished by a semicircular motion of the arc to the right and left of the direction of welding. Weaving serves to increase the width of the deposit, decreases overlap, and assists in slag formation.

Wire Feed Speed

The rate of speed in mm/sec or in./min at which a filler metal is consumed in arc welding or thermal spraying.

Work Angle

The angle between the electrode and one of the joints.

Work Lead

The electric conductor (cable) between the source of arc welding current and the workpiece.

See also: Arc Cutting, Welding.

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Subjects: Mechanical Engineering


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